SED - Standard key bindings

SED  -  Standard Key Bindings

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SED commands in the default key bindings consist of keystrokes which are

Control shift + key

ESCape followed by another key

Ctrl-X followed by another key

Ctrl-X followed by control shift + key

 

 

The table below summarises the standard editor function key bindings but these can be changed. All other keystrokes except for unused control shift codes cause the character to be inserted into the record text at the current cursor position.

 


Ctrl-

Esc-

Ctrl-X -

Ctrl-X Ctrl-

A

Start line

 

 

 

B

Back char

Back word

Goto buffer

*List buffers

C

Repeat

Capital init

*Quit

*Quit

D

Delete char

Delete word

*List records

Dive

E

End line

Run extension

*Execute macro

 

F

Forward char

Forward word

 

*Find record

G

Cancel

Goto line

 

 

H

Backspace

 

 

 

I

Tab

Align text

Import

 

J

Newline

 

 

 

K

Kill line

 

Delete buffer

 

L

Refresh

Lowercase

 

Lowercase region

M

Newline

Compile

Compile and run

 

N

Down line

Next buffer

 

Nudge down

O

Overlay

 

Toggle window

 

P

Up line

Previous buffer

 

Nudge up

Q

Quote char

Quote char

Query replace

 

R

Reverse search

Reverse search

Replace

 

S

Forward search

Forward search

Save record

Save record

T

Toggle chars

 

 

 

U

Repeat

Uppercase

Up to parent

Uppercase region

V

Forward screen

Back screen

View

 

W

Delete region

Copy region

*Write record

*Write record

X

Ctrl-X prefix

*Command

*Export

Swap mark

Y

Insert kill buffer

Insert kill buffer

 

 

Z

Up line

 

 

Nudge up

1

 

 

Unsplit window

 

2

 

 

Split window

 

(

 

 

*Start macro

 

)

 

 

*End macro

 

=

 

 

*Expand char

 

.

 

Set mark

 

 

<

 

Top

 

 

>

 

Bottom

 

 

Bkspc

Backspace

Back del word

 

 

Del

Delete char

 

 

 

Space

 

Close spaces

 

 

 

 

Functions marked with an asterisk cannot be included in a macro and cannot be repeated using the repeat or repeat count functions.

 

Some functions are available using alternative key sequences. Such alternatives are shown in the descriptions.

 

Most functions can be repeated multiple times by use of the repeat count prefix. Unless otherwise specified, the repeat count defaults to one if not explicitly set. Some functions use the repeat counter for different purposes.

 

When learning SED, the Quick Reference Chart summarises the more important commands.